Weatherford Democrat

CNHI Special Projects

April 25, 2013

Separating tornado facts from fiction

Whether you live in Tornado Alley or you've never had the misfortune of hearing the wail of a tornado siren, you probably have heard some old wives' tales about twisters. What's true, and what isn't? Here's the breakdown, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration:

Fiction: Lakes, rivers and mountains protect areas from tornadoes.

Fact: No geographic location is safe from tornadoes. A tornado near Yellowstone National Park left a path of destruction up and down a 10,000-foot mountain.


Fiction: A tornado causes buildings to "explode" as it passes overhead.

Fact: Violent winds and debris slamming into buildings cause the most structural damage.


Fiction: Open windows before a tornado approaches to equalize pressure and minimize damage.

Fact: Virtually all buildings leak. Leave windows closed. Take shelter immediately. An underground shelter, basement or safe room are the safest places. Otherwise, go to a windowless interior room.

Information from the National Oceanic and Atomospheric Administration

 

1
Text Only
CNHI Special Projects
Must Read
Top News
House Ads
AP Video
Raw: Gunmen Attack Iraqi Prison Convoy Plane Leaves Ukraine With More Crash Victims The Rock Brings Star Power to Premiere Raw: Families Travel to Taiwan Plane Crash Site Arizona Execution Takes Almost Two Hours Gen. Odierno Discusses Ukraine, NATO at Forum Gaza Fighting Rages Amid Cease-Fire Efforts Mint Gives JFK Coin a Face-lift Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers Ariz. Inmate Dies 2 Hours After Execution Began Crash Kills Teen Pilot Seeking World Record LeBron James Sends Apology Treat to Neighbors Raw: Funeral for Man Who Died in NYPD Custody Migrants Back in Honduras After US Deports Israeli American Reservist Torn Over Return