Weatherford Democrat

Local News

July 21, 2013

City streets overall in ‘good’ condition

By BRIAN SMITH

Most of Weatherford’s streets are in “good” condition, a new report has found.

On average, city streets received an overall score of 66, which is in the good range on the Overall Condition Index (which rates a number of things, including common perception of condition including potholes, different forms of cracking, ruts, how much patching has been done and others.

Earlier this year, all the streets in Weatherford were laser analyzed and actually driven over by officials with Infrastructure Management Services. That accounts for 168 miles of paved roads over a week-long timeframe. According to the report, at an average replacement cost of just under $1 million per mile, the city has $164 million invested in its paved roads.

Under the OCI format, streets received a score based on a number of factors. Streets can receive a rating of very poor (scores from 0-30) all the way up to excellent (85-100).

Having streets rated “good” overall means they have a life expectancy of between 10 to 15 years. The OCI definition of “good,” as provided in the report,  indicates that thin overlays and some heavier surfacing treatments are required.

The report also provided a sampling of which streets in the city fell into one of seven categories. For the city, roughly 6 percent of streets are rated very poor by the OCI but more than 25 percent are rated very good and just under that rated excellent, the highest rating.

“Overall, the City of Weatherford has a very solid network foundation,” the report stated. “The majority of the network falls under the very good category, and the city’s amount of failed streets is right at the ideal average of 15 percent, which gives the city more financial flexibility in managing pavements.”

Recommendations were made to keep the streets in good shape. Among the suggestions include the city adopting a policy statement identifying desired level of service and acceptable amount of backlog. A target budget for materials of $1.4 million a year would maintain the current OCI at 66 for five years while reducing backlog, the report stated.

Without increases, which would more than double the present material budget of $663,000, the OCI is expected to drop four points and the backlog of streets would increase, requiring additional rehab funds and making it just about impossible from a funding point of view.

Having the streets surveyed every few years to update condition and rehab data is also a way suggested to keep overall costs down.

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