Weatherford Democrat

January 25, 2013

Affordable care for canines and cats

Local animal group organizes monthly low-cost shots, minor surgeries clinic


Weatherford Democrat

— By BRIAN SMITH

Another Parker county organization is working to ease the load on the Parker County Animal Shelter by offering low cost immunizations and surgeries.

Parker County Pets Alive, in cooperation with the Texas Coalition for Animal Protection and Cow Camp Cowboy Church, is offering the services at the church the fourth Thursday of every month. Parker County Pets Alive President Lee Ann Adams said the clinics have been going on since August and have been averaging between 20 and 40 small pets per clinic.

Adams said the group was founded in May and is centered on community outreach and pet ownership.

“We’re kind of the organization that connects the dots between organizations that want to help,” Adams said. “We saw the need for low cost clinics and wanted to meet the need for that.”

Adams said a few churches were contacted last summer but the areas being carpeted presented an issue. Working at the church, which allows pets in during regular Sunday services, has been great.

“Most times you can’t even tell they were here,” Jennifer Robicheaux with the church, said. “It’s been really great.”

Adams says a typical day at the mobile animal hospital begins with pets being dropped off between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. for surgeries such as micro-chipping, spays, neuters and such. Vaccinations for diseases such as rabies and heart worm run from 10 a.m. to noon.

The afternoons are spent cleaning up the facility and giving animals back to their owners.

Rabies vaccinations are $5 with micro-chipping done for $30. A $10 discount is given if a pet is being spayed or neutered, Adams said.

Church interim pastor Randy Nutt said part of the church’s ministry revolves around animals.

“The way I look at it, we’re simply doing what any cowboy would do and help an animal,” Nutt said.

Marlene Miller, DVM, has been working with the TCAP for five years now. She said being a veterinarian at an animal shelter became too much for her after seeing what the animals endured.

“I love doing this, however, because I can still help animals and the shelters,” Miller said after performing a spay on a dog.

“I like the fact that I get to go into areas where a lot of folks can’t afford the $300 for the sterilization which only breeds more breeding and puts more pressure on the shelter. It feels good.”

For more information on Parker County Pets Alive, visit the organization’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/parkercountypetsalive.