DEAR DR. GOTT: Please tell your readers who have uterine prolapse about the easy, inexpensive, nonsurgical solution of a pessary. I can’t believe what a difference this has made in the quality of my life. I was feeling pressure and had a constant urge to urinate that was very distressing. I have had a pessary in for several years now and it’s great! I still have to get up several times a night, and there is still some stress incontinence, but I’m comfortable.

DEAR READER: Pessaries (devices worn in the vagina to support a displaced uterus) are inexpensive, safe and have been used for years with excellent results. They often permit women to avoid surgery. That is reason enough to rely on the devices to improve quality of life.

To give you related information, I am sending you a copy of my Health Report “Vaginal Infections and Disorders.” Other readers who would like a copy should send a self-addressed No. 10 letter-sized stamped envelope and $2 to Newsletter, PO Box 167, Wickliffe, OH 44092. Be sure to mention the title.



DEAR DR. GOTT: My husband has high cholesterol, and his doctor at the clinic said that if he couldn’t get it down on his own and refused to take medication, he wanted him to sign a release stating this fact. The doctor told him to take niacin and drink half a glass of red wine each night to help lower his levels. My husband thinks this is enough but continues to eat a great deal of cheese, bacon and salami. I’m afraid for him. Am I justified?

DEAR READER: Unfortunately, yes. However, your husband appears to be willing to make some modifications. He has taken a step in the right direction by using niacin. For appropriate benefits, he should be taking 1,000 to 1,500 milligrams every day. (About 500 to 750 milligrams twice daily works best.)

An important step he has yet to take is to modify his diet. A low-fat, low-cholesterol diet may, by itself, reduce his cholesterol level dramatically. From your brief note, it appears his cholesterol is high due to dietary and lifestyle choices rather than genetic factors. If diet does not lower his numbers significantly, he may have a genetic predisposition to elevated cholesterol and will need medication. If he chooses to start with alternative therapies, I recommend niacin, flaxseed oil and omega-3 fish oil. These can be taken individually but may have a bigger impact if taken together. If these fail, he may then need to consider prescription medications, such as Vytorin or Lipitor.

Your husband needs to make changes. He is at risk for coronary disease, heart attack and more. However, he will not change until he is ready. Unfortunately, for many people, it takes having a heart attack or other serious health disorder for them to get serious about making changes. I hope your husband is not one of these people and that he takes his health seriously.

To give you related information, I am sending you a copy of my Health Report “Understanding Cholesterol.” Other readers who would like a copy should send a self-addressed, number 10 stamped envelope and $2 to Newsletter, PO Box 167, Wickliffe, OH 44092. Be sure to mention the title.

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If readers would like to contact Dr. Gott, they may send their mail directly to Dr. Gott c/o United Media, 200 Madison Ave., 4th fl., New York, NY 10016. However, if readers want to request a newsletter, they should write to the Ohio address.



Doctor Gott is a retired physician and the author of the book “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Diet,” available at most chain and independent bookstores, and the recently published “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Cookbook.”

(c) 2008, NEA

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